Power Supplies for LED Driving 2nd Edition

Power Supplies for LED Driving 2nd Edition

: ELSEVIER

: 1110000015750

: Book

$74.95

Description

Power Supplies for LED Driving, Second Edition explores the wide use of light-emitting diodes due to their efficient use of power. The applications for power LEDs include traffic lights, street lamps, automotive lighting, architectural lights, theatre lighting, household light replacements, signage lighting (replacing neon strip lights and fluorescent tubes), LCD display backlighting, and many more.

Powering (driving) these LED's is not always simple. Linear driving is inefficient and generates far too much heat. With a switching supply, the main issues are EMI, efficiency, and of course cost. This book covers the design trade-offs involved in LED driving applications, from low-power, to UB-LEDs and beyond.

Key Features

  • Provides a practical, hands-on approach to power supply design for LED drivers
  • Contains detailed examples of what works throughout the design process
  • Presents commentary on how the calculated component value compares with the actual value used, including a description of why the choice was made

Readership

Electronics engineers and circuit designers designing power supplies for LED driver circuits

Table of Contents

  • Biography
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Introduction
    • Abstract
    • 1.1. Objectives and General Approach
    • 1.2. Description of Contents
  • Chapter 2: Characteristics of LEDs
    • Abstract
    • 2.1. Applications for LEDs
    • 2.2. Light Measure
    • 2.3. Equivalent Circuit to a LED
    • 2.4. Voltage Drop Versus Color and Current
    • 2.5. Common Mistakes
  • Chapter 3: Driving LEDs
    • Abstract
    • 3.1. Voltage Source
    • 3.2. Current Source
    • 3.3. Testing LED Drivers
    • 3.4. Common Mistakes
    • 3.5. Conclusions
  • Chapter 4: Linear Power Supplies
    • Abstract
    • 4.1. Voltage Regulators
    • 4.2. Constant Current Circuits
    • 4.3. Switched Linear Current Regulators for AC Mains Operation
    • 4.4. Advantages and Disadvantages
    • 4.5. Limitations
    • 4.6. Common Errors in Designing Linear LED Drivers
  • Chapter 5: Buck-Based LED Drivers
    • Abstract
    • 5.1. Synchronous Buck
    • 5.2. Hysteretic Buck
    • 5.3. Peak Current Control
    • 5.4. Average Current Control
    • 5.5. Microcontroller-Based Systems
    • 5.6. Buck Circuits for Low–Medium Voltage Applications
    • 5.7. Buck Circuits for High Voltage Input
    • 5.8. AC Circuits With Triac Dimmers
    • 5.9. Double Buck
    • 5.10. Buck Design Mistakes
  • Chapter 6: Boost Converters
    • Abstract
    • 6.1. Charge Pump Boost Converters
    • 6.2. Inductor-Based Boost Converters
    • 6.3. Boost Converter Operating Modes
    • 6.4. Design of a Continuous Conduction Mode Boost Circuit
    • 6.5. Design of a Discontinuous Conduction Mode Boost LED Driver
    • 6.6. Common Mistakes
    • 6.7. Conclusions
  • Chapter 7: Boost–Buck Converter
    • Abstract
    • 7.1. The Ćuk Converter
    • 7.2. SEPIC Boost–Buck Converters
    • 7.3. Buck–Boost Topology
    • 7.4. Four-Switch Buck–Boost
    • 7.5. Common Mistakes in Boost–Buck Circuits
    • 7.6. Conclusions
  • Chapter 8: Nonisolated Power Factor Correction Circuits
    • Abstract
    • 8.1. Power Factor Correction Defined
    • 8.2. Typical PFC Boost Circuit
    • 8.3. Boost–Buck Single Switch Circuit
    • 8.4. Boost–Linear Regulator Circuit
    • 8.5. Bi-Bred
    • 8.6. Buck–Boost–Buck
    • 8.7. LED Driver Design Example Using the BBB Circuit
    • 8.8. Buck With PFC
    • 8.9. Common Mistakes With PFC Circuits
    • 8.10. Conclusions
  • Chapter 9: Fly-Back Converters and Isolated PFC Circuits
    • Abstract
    • 9.1. Single-Winding Fly-Back (Buck–Boost)
    • 9.2. Two-Winding Fly-Back
    • 9.3. Three-Winding Fly-Back
    • 9.4. Three-Winding Fly-Back PFC
  • Chapter 10: Essentials of Switching Power Supplies
    • Abstract
    • 10.1. Linear Regulators
    • 10.2. Switching Regulators
  • Chapter 11: Selecting Components for LED Drivers
    • Abstract
    • 11.1. Discrete Semiconductors
    • 11.2. Passive Components
    • 11.3. The Printed Circuit Board
    • 11.4. Operational Amplifiers and Comparators
    • 11.5. High-Side Current Sense
  • Chapter 12: Magnetic Materials for Inductors and Transformers
    • Abstract
    • 12.1. Ferrite Cores
    • 12.2. Iron Dust Cores
    • 12.3. Special Cores
    • 12.4. Core Shapes and Sizes
    • 12.5. Magnetic Saturation
    • 12.6. Copper Losses
  • Chapter 13: EMI and EMC Issues
    • Abstract
    • 13.1. EMI Standards
    • 13.2. Good EMI Design Techniques
    • 13.3. EMC Standards
    • 13.4. EMC Practices
  • Chapter 14: Thermal Considerations
    • Abstract
    • 14.1. Efficiency and Power Loss
    • 14.2. Calculating Temperature
    • 14.3. Handling Heat–Cooling Techniques
  • Chapter 15: Safety Issues
    • Abstract
    • 15.1. AC Mains Isolation
    • 15.2. Circuit Breakers
    • 15.3. Creepage Distance
    • 15.4. Clearance Distance
    • 15.5. Working Voltages
    • 15.6. Capacitor Ratings
    • 15.7. Low Voltage Operation
  • Chapter 16: Control Systems
    • Abstract
    • 16.1. Triac Dimming
    • 16.2. 1–10 V Dimming
    • 16.3. DALI
    • 16.4. DMX
    • 16.5. LIN Bus
    • 16.6. CAN Bus
    • 16.7. Wireless Control
  • Chapter 17: Applications
    • Abstract
    • 17.1. Light Bulb Replacements
    • 17.2. Tube Light Replacements
    • 17.3. Streetlights
    • 17.4. Theatre and Stage Lighting
    • 17.5. Agriculture Lighting
    • 17.6. Underwater Lighting
    • 17.7. Battery-Powered Lights
    • 17.8. Signage and Channel Lighting
    • 17.9. Vehicle Lighting
    • 17.10. Other Lighting
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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